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9 March 2017 Question Bank

 

9th MARCH 2017

QUESTION BANK

(1 Question)

Answer questions in NOT MORE than 200 words each. Content of the answer is more important than its length.

Links are provided for reference. You can also use the Internet fruitfully to further enhance and strengthen your answers

GS III : Security

1.   What are the challenges involved in bringing police reforms in India. Discuss the measures to bring Police reforms in India . (200 Words)

Introduction

 

  • The need for police reforms in India is long recognised. There has been almost three decades of discussion by government created committees and commissions. Way back in 1979 the National Police Commission (NPC) was set up to report on policing and give recommendations for reform. The Commission produced eight reports, dozens of topic specific recommendations and also a Model Police Act. None of the major recommendations were adopted by any government. This persuaded two former Director General’s of Police (DGPs) in 1996 to file a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) in the Supreme Court asking the Court to direct governments to implement the NPC recommendations. In the course of the 10 year long case, in 1998 the Court set up the Ribeiro Committee which handed in its reports in 1999. This was followed by the Padmanabhaiah Committee report in 2000 and eventually the Police Act Drafting Committee (PADC or Soli Sorabjee Committee) that drafted a new model police bill to replace the colonial 1861 Police Act. Meanwhile very little was ever done on the ground to improve policing or implement recommendations put forth by any of these committees or commissions.The need for police reforms in India is long recognised. There has been almost three decades of discussion by government created committees and commissions. Way back in 1979 the National Police Commission (NPC) was set up to report on policing and give recommendations for reform. The Commission produced eight reports, dozens of topic specific recommendations and also a Model Police Act. None of the major recommendations were adopted by any government. This persuaded two former Director General’s of Police (DGPs) in 1996 to file a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) in the Supreme Court asking the Court to direct governments to implement the NPC recommendations. In the course of the 10 year long case, in 1998 the Court set up the Ribeiro Committee which handed in its reports in 1999. This was followed by the Padmanabhaiah Committee report in 2000 and eventually the Police Act Drafting Committee (PADC or Soli Sorabjee Committee) that drafted a new model police bill to replace the colonial 1861 Police Act. Meanwhile very little was ever done on the ground to improve policing or implement recommendations put forth by any of these committees or commissions.
  • The Challenges involved are as follows :
  • Historical – The colonial and archaic laws that govern the police.
  • Police is State subject: Since it is a state subject, any intervention form centre or SC would require multiple consultation which is time consuming.
  • Lack of political will: The police – politician nexus is so much deep-rooted that states are reluctant to implement any of the directions. The reforms have been resisted not only by politicians but also some officers.
  • No Public Pressure: Police reforms have been unappealing to general public on pretext of callousness by police towards common man’s simple & legitimate requests.
  • Cold Response from Centre: Instead of directing the states to comply to SC directions, the Centre directed states to implement some recommendations of 2nd ARC.
  • Technological problems : Lack of Technology and absence of modern weaponry.
  • Numbers: The global average ratio of police-population is 270 to 100,000, where it’s 120 in India. With far less police – ill trained, ill-equipped and most of them are posted to protect the politicians, people of India are the least secure (most vulnerable) people in the world.
  • Measures to Bring Police reforms in India are as follows 
  • The 22 September, 2006 verdict of the Supreme Court in the Prakash Singh vs Union of India case was the landmark in the fight for police reforms in India.
  • It gave Seven directives for  Police reforms in India
  • Thus, Implementing the SC directive would help to bring in much needed Police reforms. Also, PM, at the Guwahati Conference of the Directors General of Police on November 30, 2014, enunciated the concept of SMART Police - a police which should be sensitive, mobile, alert, reliable and techno-savvy in this Contemporary World.

 

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