+91 9004418746enquiry.aashah@gmail.com
+91 9004078746aashahs.ias@gmail.com

Current Events 14 January 2017

 

NEWS

14 JANUARY 2017

Sr. No.

Topic

News

1.

GS II: POLITY - JUDICIARY

So what’s the big deal about advancing the Budget, asks SC

2.

GS II: POLITY - LEGISLATURE

House panel not to summon PM on demonetisation

3.

GS III : DISASTER MANAGEMENT

Surviving drought: Kerala imposes curbs on water use

4.

GS III : ENVIRONMENT- POLLUTION

Smog disrupts flights across south India

5.

GS II: POLITY – RIVER WATERS

Cost of Ken-Betwa project now goes up to ₨18,000 crore

6.

GS II: STATUTORY BODIES

AI software purchase under CBI scanner

7.

GS II: INTERNATIONAL - PAKISTAN

Pakistan missiles worry U.S.; 47 entities under strict watch

8.

GS III:  ECONOMY

Number of unemployed in India to climb: ILO

9.

GS III : ECONOMY

Trade deficit narrows in December

10.

GS II : ECONOMY

NITI Aayog to soon set up panel on poverty line

11.

GS II : HEALTH

Indian pepper may be a cancer fighter

12.

GSIII : ENVIRONMENT

In Praise of Air, a poem that ‘cleans’ your environment

GS II: POLITY- JUDICIARY

So what’s the big deal about advancing the Budget, asks SC

  • The Supreme Court said it found nothing wrong in the government’s move to advance the presentation of the Union Budget in Parliament by almost a month, on February 1, amid the run-up to the elections in five States.
  • A PIL petition, had sought the postponement of the annual Budget till after the elections are over. He said it could contain sops to influence the voters in the Assembly elections, and was thus a violation of the poll code.
  • The court said there is only a government statement that the Budget is going to be presented on February 1.
  • “So what provision of law is violated by this statement? What provision of the Indian Constitution is violated here?” Chief Justice Khehar asked.

 

GS II: POLITY - LEGISLATURE

House panel not to summon PM on demonetization

  • In a stormy meeting of the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) of Parliament, BJP members prevailed upon chairperson and former Union Minister K.V. Thomas to give his assent to a clarification that the committee did not have the powers to summon either Prime Minister Narendra Modi or any other Minister with regard to any issue before it.
  • The committee said in a release, “Ministers shall not be called before the Committee either to give evidence or consultation in connection with the examination of estimates of accounts.”
  • “however, [the] chairperson, when [it is] considered necessary but after its [committee’s] deliberations are concluded, may have an informal interaction with the Minister.”

GS III : DISASTER  MANAGEMENT

Surviving drought: Kerala imposes curbs on water use

  • Faced with a worsening drought situation, the Kerala government has imposed curbs on the use of water in reservoirs.
  • It has also stepped up the review and monitoring system at the district levels.
  • District Collectors have been directed to stop the release of water through canals for irrigation, and keep a close tab on the water level in reservoirs.
  • The assessment of the water situation in terms of Litres Per Capita per Day (LPCD) is being reported to the government on a regular basis.
  • Efforts are on to establish drinking water kiosks in all wards.
  • The government is also monitoring the utilisation of  groundwater..

GS III : ENVIRONMENT - POLLUTION

Smog disrupts flights across south India

  • Flights were disrupted across south India as smog and fog considerably reduced visibility.

GS II: POLITY – RIVER WATERS

Cost of Ken-Betwa project now goes up to ₨18,000 crore

  • The cost of the National Democratic Alliance government’s marquee river interlinking project to transfer water from the Ken to the Betwa river has now reached Rs. 18,000 crore, or nearly double the estimate used by the National Board for Wildlife to accord clearances to the project in 2016.
  • The main feature of the project is a 230-km long canal and a series of barrages and dams connecting the Ken and Betwa rivers that will irrigate 3.5 lakh hectares in Madhya Pradesh and 14,000 hectares of land in Uttar Pradesh’s Bundelkhand.
  • The key projects are the Makodia and Dhaudhan dams, the latter expected to be 77 metres high and responsible for submerging 5,803 hectares of tiger habitat in the Panna Tiger Reserve.
  • Because it disturbs the habitat of resident wildlife and requires the diversion of forest land in Madhya Pradesh, the project required a wildlife, forest and environmental clearance by separate, independent committees.
  • The Environment Clearance Committee records that an additional Rs. 5,037 crore would be required as part of the project’s environmental protection plan.
  • Officials involved with the project said that re-evaluations of the cost of resettlement and rehabilitation of families resident in the area, and re-estimating the cost of the value of the forests that would be lost to the dam, as well as inflation, have led to the escalated costs.

GS II: STATUTORY BODIES

AI software purchase under CBI scanner

  • The Central Bureau of Investigation has registered a case against unknown officials of Air India, German company SAP AG and IBM, for alleged irregularities in the purchase of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software worth ₨. 225 crore for the national carrier in 2011.
  • The case was filed following a recommendation by the Central Vigilance Commission (CVC), which found “serious procedural and other irregularities in the procurement as well as the amount paid and the extent of services rendered.”

CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISION (CVC)

  • The Central Vigilance Commission was set up by the Government in 1964 on the recommendations of the Committee on Prevention of Corruptionheaded by Shri K. Santhanam, to advise and guide Central Government agencies in the field of vigilance.
  • CVC is conceived to be the apex vigilance institution, free of control from any executive authority, monitoring all vigilance activity under the Central Government and advising various authorities in Central Government organizations in planning, executing, reviewing and reforming their vigilance work.
  • Consequent upon promulgation of an Ordinance by the President, the Central Vigilance Commission was given “statutory status” in 1998.
  • The Central Vigilance Commission Act 2003 was later effected by the Parliament.

      The provisions provide that the CVC shall consist of:

  • A Central Vigilance Commissioner - Chairperson;
  • Not more than two Vigilance Commissioners - Members;

 

Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI)

  • The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of India, which simultaneously serves as the nation's prime central law enforcement agency.
  • The CBI is overseen by the Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions of the central government, headed by a Cabinet Minister who reports directly to the Prime Minister.
  • The CBI was established in 1941 as the Special Police Establishment, tasked with domestic security. It was renamed the Central Bureau of Investigation on 1 April 1963.
  • Its motto is "Industry, Impartiality, Integrity".

GS II: INTERNATIONAL - PAKISTAN

Pakistan missiles worry U.S.; 47 entities under strict watch

  • The United States government is increasingly worried over the rising range and variety of Islamabad’s missile capability and the recent decision of the Obama administration to impose trade restrictions on seven Pakistani entities came out of this concern.
  • All the entities are linked to Pakistan’s missile programme.
  • With the addition of these seven, there are 47 Pakistani entities that are under strict watch of the U.S agencies.
  • What has triggered the alarm bells in Washington is Shaheen-III, which has a range of 2,750 km.
  • Pakistan has officially explained its longest-range missile to date, tested for the first time in 2015, as a capability to strike the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the farthest Indian territory from its shores.
  • But the missile also has Israel in its range, along with several European countries – something that the U.S. strategic community finds unnerving.

GS III:  ECONOMY

Number of unemployed in India to climb: ILO

  • The number of unemployed people in India is expected to rise by 1 lakh in 2017 and another 2 lakh in 2018, according to the International Labour Organisation (ILO).
  • The ILO predicted that the number of jobless will increase from 17.7 million in 2016 to 18 million by 2018 even though the country’s unemployment rate is expected to go down from 3.5 per cent to 3.4 per cent in 2017.
  • Globally, the ILO reckons that the number of jobless people will increase by 3.4 million in 2017, in its report on World Employment and Social Outlook for 2017, with projections based on econometric modelling carried out in November 2016.
  • The global unemployment rate is expected to rise modestly from 5.7 to 5.8 per cent in 2017 as the pace of labour force growth outstrips job creation.
  • Vulnerable forms of employment, which include contributing family workers and own account workers, are expected to stay above 42 per cent of total employment.
  • About 1.4 billion people are likely to be engaged in such employment in 2017, with the number rising by 11 million per year, with Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa being the most affected.
  • Global uncertainty and the lack of decent jobs are, among other factors, underpinning social unrest and migration in many parts of the world.

International Labour Organization (ILO)

  • The International Labour Organization (ILO), founded in 1919, is a United Nations agency dealing with labour issues, particularly international labour standards, social protection, and work opportunities for all.
  • The ILO has 187 member states: 186 of the 193 UN member states plus the Cook Islands are members of the ILO.
  • In 1969, the organization received the Nobel Peace Prize for improving peace among classes, pursuing decent work and justice for workers, and providing technical assistance to other developing nations.
  • The ILO registers complaints against entities that are violating international rules; however, it does not impose sanctions on governments.

GS III:  ECONOMY

Trade deficit narrows in December

  • India’s trade deficit narrowed to $10.36 billion in December 2016 — the lowest in the last three months — as exports expanded year-on- year for the fourth consecutive month and outpaced imports, according to data released by the Commerce Ministry.
  • Eighteen of the 30 major export segments, including petroleum products, drugs and pharma, gems and jewellery, recorded a growth in December 2016.
  • The 5.72% growth in December 2016 was up from 2.26% in November 2016 but slower than 8.22% in October 2016.
  • Imports rose by just 0.46 % to $34.25 billion in December 2016.
  • Gold imports shrunk (-) 48.5 % to $1.96 billion after having risen in the previous two months.
  • In terms of growth, this was the lowest since (-) 77.44 % in August 2016, while in value terms it was the lowest since $1.94 billion in September 2016.

 

GS III:  ECONOMY

NITI Aayog to soon set up panel on poverty line

  • NITI Aayog, the government’s premier think-tank, will soon set up an expert committee to arrive at a new poverty line, according to an official.
  • “Pursuant to the decision taken at the first meeting of the Governing Council of NITI Aayog held under the chairmanship of Prime Minister Narendra Modi on February 8, 2015, a Task Force on Elimination of Poverty in India was set up by NITI Aayog on March 16, 2015.

GS II : HEALTH

Indian pepper may be a cancer fighter

  • The Indian long pepper, widely popular for spicing up food, may soon be used as a potential cancer treatment drug, according to a new study.
  • The Indian long pepper contains a chemical that could stop your body from producing an enzyme that is commonly found in tumours in large numbers, according to the study in Journal of Biological Chemistry.
  • Long pepper’s expected medicinal properties date back thousands of years.
  • The secret lies in a chemical called Piperlongumine (PL), which has shown activity against many cancers including prostate, breast, lung, colon, lymphoma, leukaemia, primary brain tumours and gastric cancer.
  • Using X-ray crystallography, researchers were able to create molecular structures that show how the chemical is transformed after being ingested.
  • PL converts to hPL, an active drug that silences a gene called GSTP1.
  • The GSTP1 gene produces a detoxification enzyme that is often overly abundant in tumours, the study said.

 

GSIII : ENVIRONMENT

In Praise of Air, a poem that ‘cleans’ your environment

  • A revolutionary air cleansing poem, In Praise of Air, has removed more than two tonnes of pollution from the environment in the U.K. as part of a project that could be used to fight pollution in cities across the world, a leading British University claimed.
  • The poem was produced by scientists and writers at the University of Sheield in the U.K.
  • The catalytic poem by award-winning writer Simon Armitage, Professor of Poetry in the University’s School of English, has been printed on specially treated material developed by scientists at the university that is capable of purifying its surroundings through catalytic oxidation.
  • The poem, which has been on display on the University of Sheffield’s Alfred Denny building since May 2014, has now reached the end of its exhibition in Sheffield, and the project team has estimated that it has removed over two tonnes of nitrogen oxide from the surrounding environment.
  • The team now hopes the poem and its air-cleansing technology can be replicated on billboards and artwork in towns and cities across the world.

 


 

Back to Top